Like wildfire!

Aircraft incidents usually take place at or near an airport. This means that the airport's own fire service plays a critical role, but so do other local fire- and emergency services! This blended learning programme prepares local firefighters for the incidents they may encounter.

Organizations 1 header 12 04 10 0521brandweer schiphol 1

The challenge.

About 80 million passengers fly to and from the Netherlands every year, of which more than 70 million arrive at and depart from Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. And the amount of air traffic in the Netherlands continues to grow, partly due to the ongoing expansion of Lelystad Airport. Although flying is still one of the safest means of transport, incidents do occur. Eighty percent of these incidents take place at or near an airport. When an incident occurs, the airport's own fire service plays a critical role, but so do other local fire- and emergency services!

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol's fire service was asked to develop a programme to prepare other local fire services (from various safety regions) for action, in the event of an aircraft incident. In co-creation with Schiphol's fire service, Brainstud has developed the blended learning programmeAircraft incident control”, in terms of content and visuals. In this learning programme, we use a real-life practical example: the crash of Turkish Airlines Flight 1951 in a field near Schiphol (the so-called Poldercrash).

 

The crash of Turkish Airlines Flight 1951. | Photo: Fred Vloo - RNW
The crash of Turkish Airlines Flight 1951. | Photo: Fred Vloo - RNW

The learning solution.

The learning programme consists of five chapters. In the first chapter, we focus on a model that explains the various phases of a fire service deployment during an aircraft incident. While explaining this model, we consistently refer to the 'Poldercrash'. This recognisable example clearly illustrates that the model functions differently in practice than in theory!

In the following chapters, participants learn about the construction and hazards of various types of aircraft, such as commercial planes, sports planes, F-16s and helicopters. By working with 3D models, participants can examine the various types of aircraft from every angle. In this way, they can still learn where the (emergency) exits and danger zones are located, without ever having seen the aircraft in real life. 

The 3D models allow participants to get to know the aircrafts from all sides.

In addition to the 3D models, we use interactive widgets, schematic drawings and photos and videos of real-life incident control operations. Each chapter ends with a practice test. The entire learning programme is concluded with a final exam, which challenges participants and determines whether they have retained the necessary knowledge.

The learning programme is used in a blended way. First of all, firefighters go through the online course materials themselves and test their knowledge. Next, they take part in a practical training session held on the training grounds of Schiphol's fire service. Here, participants can put everything they've learned into practice during a simulated incident.

During the explanation of the model, we consistently refer to the real-life practical example of the ‘Poldercrash’.
During the explanation of the model, we consistently refer to the real-life practical example of the ‘Poldercrash’.01 / 02
Each phase of the fire service deployment during an incident is worked out visually.
Each phase of the fire service deployment during an incident is worked out visually.02 / 02

Do you want more information?